Questions

School Art Programs

School Art Programs

Q. With recent art programs being cut from schools, some parents may not see the benefit or may not be able to afford self-funding.

A. After 23 years in dance education, I can vouch for the benefits arts education provides. Along with the physical and mental benefits, an education in the arts builds character too. Dance students learn time management that includes arriving on time to a rehearsal, managing time between school and dance projects, and the discipline learned in packing the appropriate uniforms, shoes, etc. Social lessons are also learned; including how to work well with others, team building, and if needed, conflict resolution. Arts education is so much more than putting brush to canvas, or learning steps in a ballet. The lessons learned benefit the child well beyond the time spent in the studio.

Daniel Tardibono, Administrative Director of Schools Texas Ballet Theater | texasballettheater.org

Picky Eater

Picky Eater

Q. My daughter, age 15, is still a picky eater. She refuses most everything.

A. Girls are very conscious of their bodies at this age. You should talk with her and make every effort not to discuss her food intake. Ask her how she is and if she is worried about anything. Let her know that you are concerned about her. Emotional pressures are a big part of what leads to disordered eating issues. If she is not open to a conversation with you, let her know that, with you, she can seek guidance from a Registered Dietitian, or from her doctor. As parents we need to use our “parental intuition” when it comes to our children’s health and well-being.

Mary Ellen Caldwell, RDN

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No interested in art class

No interested in art class

Q. My son (age 11) likes to draw and paint, however, he has no interest in participating in an art class.

A. It sounds like you have a true artist on your hands! Like any true artist, your son is probably resistant to the structure of art class. To encourage his interests, make sure that he has easy access to sketch books, pencils, and paints. I encourage my students to keep a tiny sketch book in their pocket, so they can get their ideas on paper quickly. Remind him that every art teacher and every art class is different. He might not enjoy his current art class, but the next one may be a perfect fit. Consider art classes that keep the class size small, so he can have more individualized attention. That might make all the difference!

Color Me Empowered | www.colormeempowered.org

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College Admission

College Admission

Q. How can I look my strongest to the colleges I apply to for admission?

A. Colleges want to see students who have challenged themselves by taking either the strongest courses (Honors or AP) or have taken more in a subject than is required. They want to see students who have done their best, worked their hardest; not necessarily made the highest grades in every class. Colleges want leadership. It could be something like organizing a fun run to raise money for a cause. It is important that students “walk the walk, not just talk the talk”: If a student wants to be a doctor, they must either volunteer in a hospital, clinic and/or do some shadowing of physicians during high school. Students need to demonstrate “depth” on their resumes.

Catherine L. Marrs, CEP, Lead Certified College Counselor Info@MarrsCaa.com | www.MarrsCaa.com

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Teenager Daughter

Teenager Daughter

Q. I’ve always had a great relationship with my daughter, but recently she seems to be more private about everything.

A. I understand you’re worried, because she’s changing. It’s nothing you’ve done. Developmentally, your daughter is on a journey to determine who she is and where she fits. Creating space between the two of you is necessary for your daughter to establish her identity as a unique person. While she explores her individuality, she needs your consistency, love, and acceptance. Your presence, smile, and touch reassure her. Keep the same expectations. Express your curiosity and interest using open ended statements. Seek her expertise on fashion, food, and technology. Affirm her positive choices, talents, and accomplishments.

JoAnn Schauf | www.yourtweenandyou.com

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