Questions

Child's Eye

Child's Eye

Q. My child’s eye doesn’t look right, but it’s not pink eye. What else could it be?

A: Your child’s ability to see is critical so it’s important to identify emergencies in the blink of an eye. Anytime your child’s vision is compromised or their pupil is altered, you should seek medical attention immediately. A ruptured globe or other serious injury may require surgery. If your child’s eyelid is swollen and red, it could be an infection called periorbital cellulitis that requires antibiotics. Did a foreign object get in your child’s eye? This can cause corneal abrasions, or scratches on the surface of the eye. A physician may prescribe medicated drops to treat pain or infection. Remember whatever the injury, eyes are complex organs, so don’t take any chances. If there’s any concern, get it checked out right away.

Dr. Christina Johns | Children's Health | www.childrens.com.urgentcare

Swimming Lessons

Swimming Lessons

Q. Summer’s over. Why would I take swimming lessons in the fall/winter?

A. The “off-season” is a great time to hone swimming skills. Our area is filled with indoor pools and waterparks that may be visited year round. Swim lessons outside of the summer season get children ready before outdoor fun begins, but also make indoor excursions a great way to spice up a winter afternoon. Learning to swim at an early age is a preventive measure that provides life-saving, life-long benefits. Learning to swim without the pressures of a full summer schedule allows children to enjoy and respect the water while learning aquatic risk management.

Tracey Panzer-Michelle | Floating Kiwi Swimming School | www.infantaquatics.com

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Music Lessons

Music Lessons

Q. How can I help my child succeed in their music lessons?

A. Children excel at subjects that are important to their parents. So, the best way for your child to learn faster, go farther and have more fun with their music is to be involved. Attend lessons and participate in practice sessions. Make practice part of their daily routine (like brushing their teeth). Be positive and encouraging. Tell them how much you enjoy hearing them play. And make music a part of family life. Play music during dinner and attend live musical performances together now and then. Have family performances once a week. Be sure and clap! Let them know what you expect and watch them excel. Don’t threaten to end lessons if they resist practicing and avoid reward systems to increase motivation. Action is the issue, not motivation. Don’t give up unless you want your child to give up.

Joel Pipkin | www.ChildPlayMusicSchool.com

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Is it ADHD?

Is it ADHD?

Q. My first grader’s teacher is concerned that he may have ADHD. He can be active, but he’s also young. What should I do?

A. Almost all children have times when they seem overly active or have trouble focusing. Differentiating normal childhood activity from symptoms of ADHD can be very difficult. As children enter school, their teachers are an invaluable resource for identifying when these behaviors may be more pronounced than typical. If you or your child’s teacher have concerns, the best thing to do is to see your child’s pediatrician. Your pediatrician will rule out any underlying medical causes and guide you through the possible diagnosis and treatment options. The diagnosis of ADHD can be very scary. Keep in mind that our goal is to help your child succeed. Having an accurate diagnosis is vital in structuring the support that your child needs..

Dr. Lisa Shumate | MD Pediatric Associates | www.mdpedi.com

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play-based learning

play-based learning

Q. Why is play-based learning so powerful?

A. Play-based learning stems from a joyful learning experience that is packed with stimulation, tenacity, engagement, and meaning. An authentic play-based environment is also an academic environment. Schools that incorporate play-based learning encourage children to engage with peers in stimulating opportunities of imagination and creativity, which encourages children to think abstractly and uniquely. Children use the art of playing to connect with experiences that are meaningful in the context of their world. When children participate in unstructured play where they use multiple methods to seek solutions, they develop tenacity, perseverance and problem-solving abilities. It also develops their cognitive, social, emotional, and physical abilities, which are all attributes that make up the foundations for future success. Play-based learning can be a transformative experience because, at the end of the day, play is their work.

Julie Grebe, Director | Parker-Chase Preschool – Carrollton Campus | parker-chase.com

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